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Basel

Art Basel 2021

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Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

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Claudia Concha, "CORONA", (2020). Acrylics and ink on Paper. Framed on wood and glass. 43” x 53”. Courtesy of the artist.
Debra Disman, “Hopes and Fears and…”, (2020). Textile samples and linen thread. 24.5” x 16.5”. Courtesy of the artist.
Yrneh Gabon, "ECHO IN TIME", (2020). Mixed media; Acrylic, cactus fiber, wooden panel, 24k gold plated metal, vinyl. Treated photo paper, acrylic gel, iridescent acrylic, silver, archival black pigmented ink. 16” x 20” in. Courtesy of the artist.
Marcus Kuiland-Nazario in collaboration with Martin Cox, "Drift", (2011). Video Still. Courtesy of the artist.
Ameeta Nanji, "Whose Security ?", (2020). Paper collage, acrylic on canvas. 24” x 24”. Courtesy of the artist.
Joan Wulf, "Family Tree Rubbing", (2020). Handmade charcoal on canvas. 88” x 66”. Carlye Street in Santa Monica. Photo by Clare Larsen. Courtesy of the artist.
Courtesy of 18th Street Arts Center.
Courtesy of 18th Street Arts Center.
Art

The Pandemic and its Inequities Addressed in “Facing Darkness”

By Lola Desmole

August 13, 2020

Santa Monica’s 18th Street Arts Center is presenting an online show of work by artists made while in quarantine, “Facing Darkness.”

As one of the biggest residency programs in the United States, the Center offers artists a space to create, take risks, interact with one another as well as their public, and foster partnerships and relationships that inspire change.

Open Gallery

Claudia Concha, "CORONA", (2020). Acrylics and ink on Paper. Framed on wood and glass. 43” x 53”. Courtesy of the artist.

The 26 participating artists include Lionel Popkin, Leo Garcia, Alexandra Dillon, Gregg A Chadwick, Ameeta Nanji, and Yrneh Gabon. Their work addresses the human capacity to overcome hardships on both global and personal scales. It reveals what these past few months have meant for each person, via humor, melancholy, and uncomfortable propositions.

“Facing Darkness” is organized into three parts: Individual, Contextual, and Collective. As said Californians for the Arts director Julie Baker said recently, “A first responder comes in and saves a life. A second responder comes in and helps rebuild a life.” 18th Street Arts Center proposes that artists are second responders.

Open Gallery

Debra Disman, “Hopes and Fears and…”, (2020). Textile samples and linen thread. 24.5” x 16.5”. Courtesy of the artist.
Exhibitions

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Experience Ryoji Ikeda: data-verse 3 at Art Basel Unlimited

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