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Lauren Quin

Lauren Quin’s “Logopanic” Visualizes Language at 125 Newbury

Explore the solo exhibition "Logopanic" by Lauren Quin at 125 Newbury, filled with paintings dissecting language.

The Los Angeles-based artist Lauren Quin has debuted her latest exhibition of paintings in New York at 125 Newbury in TriBeCa. Presented in a presentation entitled “Logopanic,” on view through July 12, it is Quin’s first solo show, revealing layered compositions full of color and texture. 

“The ambition of Lauren’s work is astonishing to me,” says Arne Glimcher, Founder of 125 Newbury. “When I walked into her studio for the first time, it was a blast of fresh air. The environment her paintings created was electric. I immediately felt that there was an artist ready to take on the world. I was instantly captivated.”

On View at 125 Newbury

Lauren Quin “Lauren Quin: Logopanic” at 395 Broadway, New York, NY 10013, May 3–July 12, 2024, photo by Peter Clough.

Quin’s paintings are uniquely created—constructed layer by layer and then marked with carvings that expose these surfaces. “The layers of my work are set up as a way of mapping my own sense of entanglement, to the point where you can’t pull them apart,” Quin shared with Whitewall. “I take off as much paint as I put down and I draw on both sides of the canvas. Most of the time, I look for a type of effulgence from the painting, and that tells me when to stop.”

Lauren Quin “Lauren Quin: Logopanic” at 395 Broadway, New York, NY 10013, May 3–July 12, 2024, photo by Peter Clough.

In “Logopanic,” these works are revealed through two rooms of large-scale pieces, starting with the first piece she made in the suite and ending in the last she created. The exhibition’s name is about the Greek logos for “word” and “lack,” insinuating an inability to express to comprehend speech. The exhibition’s deeper meaning questions how language travels, and the bits that are left, lost, or longed for.

From her California studio, Quin shares with Whitewall how her latest show fell into “Logopanic” was created and what she’s up to this summer.

Behind the Scenes of “Logopanic”

Lauren Quin Portrait of Lauren Quin by Lee Thompson.

WHITEWALL: How did “Logopanic,” come together? How were the works made? 

LAUREN QUIN: “Logopanic” was one of those installations where everything fell into place. When you enter the space, the two largest paintings face each other, and hold each side of the gallery. They are natural bookends in their size, but also because they are the first and last made for this show. They bracket the rest of the show, which gives a viewer a chance to read between them. 

Lauren Quin “Lauren Quin: Logopanic” at 395 Broadway, New York, NY 10013, May 3–July 12, 2024, photo by Peter Clough.

WW: What does the title refer to?

LQ: Sometimes my life percolates into my work, and what is left isn’t always something I can put into words. Often, I need to invent a new word for what I am doing. “Logopanic” refers to the Greek logos (“word”) and penia (“lack”)—an inability to understand or express speech. It’s a type of aphasia I’ve come to know on a personal level, but it’s useless trying to keep a secret inside of a painting. “Logopanic” is about sympathetic mutations, how a language travels. These logos are namable touch-points that I carve into wet paint, enhancing their errancy. As I repeat them, they become harder and harder to grasp. 

““Logopanic” is about sympathetic mutations, how a language travels,”

–Lauren Quin

Inside Lauren Quin’s Studio

Lauren Quin “Lauren Quin: Logopanic” at 395 Broadway, New York, NY 10013, May 3–July 12, 2024, photo by Peter Clough.

WW: Can you tell us about your studio in LA? What’s the space like? What typically happens here?

LQ: Walking into my space feels about as California as it gets. My studio building was originally a boutique garden store, so it has a lot of fresh air and light. There are massive, overgrown palm trees and fruit trees that create a very lush courtyard at the front. Sometimes, I step back all the way into the garden to look at the paintings through the foliage.

“I’ve always enjoyed how the heat waves in LA change the tempo of the studio,”

—Lauren Quin

WW: You were recently in town for New York Art Week. What were some of your favorite sights or bites? 

LQ: I saw more shows than I could possibly name, but my favorites were the Howard Hodgkins show at the Met, and SoiL Thorton‘s painting show at The Journal Gallery. I stayed in Chelsea during my visit, so I drank at Fanelli Cafe several nights in a row. Dinner at Torrisi to celebrate Adam Pendleton was very special, and I had a sunny glass of wine at Rhodora bar on my way to see Issy Wood’s set in Brooklyn.

What’s Next for Lauren Quin

WW: What are you working on this summer? 

LQ: I’ve always enjoyed how the heat waves in LA change the tempo of the studio. The oil evaporates overnight, and the light lasts forever. It is a frenetic and creative season. I am also working towards a show in Europe next year, which I hope to share more details about soon!

Lauren Quin “Lauren Quin: Logopanic” at 395 Broadway, New York, NY 10013, May 3–July 12, 2024, photo by Peter Clough.

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