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Art Basel 2021

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Richard Prince, Untitled, 2007-2008, Collage and acrylic on canvas, 80 x 408 in. Private Collection. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image
Tom Sachs, Godfather Viewing Station, 2013, Mixed media, 37 x 15 x 11.5. in. Courtesy Tom Sachs Studio. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image
Installation view of “Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact” at Museum of the Moving Image. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou, courtesy of Museum of the Moving Image
Installation view of “Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact” at Museum of the Moving Image. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou, courtesy of Museum of the Moving Image
Installation view of “Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact” at Museum of the Moving Image. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou, courtesy of Museum of the Moving Image
Mario Ybarra, Jr. Scarface Museum, 2014 (Figurine Vitrine detail) Mixed media installation, overall dimensions 60 x 48 x 36 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Honor Fraser Gallery. Photo credit: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image
Richard Prince, Untitled, 2007-2008, Collage and acrylic on canvas, 80 x 408 in. Private Collection. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image
Art

Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact

By Alexis Thrower

November 11, 2015

“Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact” is a a new exhibition exploring cinematic nostalgia that opened at Museum of the Moving Image over the weekend. Through a mixture of film, photography, drawing, sculpture, and print, curator Robert M. Rubin set out to bring together a collection of works that represent iconic moments in Hollywood. Viewers are taken through a carefully curated trip, with sections titled “Thrift Shop: I Found it at the Movies” and “A Plague of Locusts” to further signify art’s connection to cinema. The title, “Walkers,” is a nod to The Walking Dead, referring to how these iconic images have lived and will continue to live on, not just in our minds, but through art. A set design for the Bates Motel neon sign from Psycho, a costume sketch for “Bunny #2” from Apocalypse Now, prints by Richard Mosse and a script for Heart of Darkness are some of the treasures that can be found in this exciting exhibition. “The visual icons and behavioral conventions of celluloid cinema circulate permanently in our unconscious even as the technologies that spawned them yield to the digital. Nowhere is this more evident than in contemporary art,” said Rubin.

Open Gallery

Richard Prince, Untitled, 2007-2008, Collage and acrylic on canvas, 80 x 408 in. Private Collection. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image

“Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact” is on view through April 10, 2016.

Open Gallery

Tom Sachs, Godfather Viewing Station, 2013, Mixed media, 37 x 15 x 11.5. in. Courtesy Tom Sachs Studio. Photo: Thanassi Karageorgiou/Museum of the Moving Image
Alexis ThrowerHolllywoodMates motelMuseum of the Moving ImageRobert M. RubinThe Walking DeadWalkersWalkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and ArtifactWhitewall

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