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Art Basel 2021

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"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
1071 Fifth Avenue
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, New York
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
Design

“Mystical Symbolism” at The Guggenheim

By Nicole Gabe

July 26, 2017

“Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892 – 1897” is currently on view at The Guggenheim in New York. The show looks at the short-lived but culturally important historic salon and annual exhibition that brought together late 19th century radical artists together. It was founded by writer and critic Joséphin Péladan to explore the mystical side of the Symbolism movement, popular at the time. In a search for the ideal, artists delved into spirituality, fighting against pervasive secularism.

Artists of the Symbolism movement made work filled with allegory, with references to literature, mythology, religion, and visually recognizable by elongated and flat forms, and exaggerated representations of the female figure. The salon gave way to the next generation of abstract painters, including Piet Mondrian and Vasily Kandinsky.

Open Gallery

"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim

The exhibition is organized by Vivien Greene, and was designed with a salon-like atmosphere in mind. The elegant setting was achieved with the help of furniture manufacture, Roche Bobois.

On view through October 4, visitors will be transported to a 19th-century salon in “Mystical Symbolism,” able to lounge on Roche Bobois pieces that evokes the style and sense of the era.

Open Gallery

"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim

“I am delighted by Roche Bobois’ presence at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, a highly regarded icon of international art and culture. It is an honor to support the Mystical Symbolism exhibition which sheds light on a captivating period of French cultural history. This collaboration exemplifies Roche Bobois’ dedication to cultural and artistic disciplines and their correlation with the creativity our brand embodies” said Gilles Bonan, CEO of Roche Bobois.

Open Gallery

"Mystical Symbolism" The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897
Courtesy of The Guggenheim
GuggenheimJoséphin PéladanMystical SymbolismRoche BoboisThe Salon de la Rose+Croix in ParisWhitewallWhitewaller

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