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Miami

Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe, Kennedy Yanko, Reginald O’Neal, and Cajsa von Zeipel

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Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

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Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of The Kooples.
Courtesy of Cerruti.
Courtesy of Faith Connexion.
Courtesy of Enfants Riches Déprimés.
Courtesy of Jil Sander.
Courtesy of Berluti.
Courtesy of Dior Homme.
Courtesy of Dior Homme.
Fashion

Fall/Winter 2018: Men’s Paris Fashion Week

By Eliza Jordan

January 24, 2018

Fall/Winter 2018 men’s fashion week came to Paris with diverse looks for the ever-growing streetwear culture. The past week was filled with bold spins on classics, spiced-up sophisticated takes on daily attire, and new essentials for the traditional wardrobe.

Artistic director Alexandre Elicha presented The Kooples’ new collection, inspired by classic horror movies like Nosferatu and A Nightmare on Elm Street. Joining the brand’s rock-‘n’-roll aesthetic, we saw homage paid to legendary director Tim Burton, seen in the collection’s prints, embroideries, and pin details. Oversized shirt and jackets were worn with destressed denim, and grunge was seen brought to masculine silhouettes with pullovers for a sportswear feel.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

For men’s artistic director Kim Jones’ last presentation for Louis Vuitton, he spotlighted the rich heritage of the brand. The past, present, and future was emphasized in pieces that can change and fabrics that can transform on a continuous, global voyage. Themes and references ranged from the Wild West to the Far East, as we saw with American classics (like shorts over leggings) and Siberian favorites (like shearling and intarsia mink). Travel inspiration was found in prints and a palette of natural earth tones. There were of course leather goods and accessories, and the Monogram Glaze—a mirror-coated high-shine finish to the monogram canvas.

Youth took over at Dior Homme, in the form of freedom, reckless abandon, and a new type of finesse. Deconstructed suits, the brand’s bar jacket, and tailored wool pieces were highlights for designer Kris Van Assche, as was, at large, the tattoo culture of the 1990s. We aw all-over prints and motifs emerging as graphic totems, and tank tops, turtlenecks, and polo shirts one after the other—seemingly out of a teenage wardrobe. Structured coats and high-pleated trousers were seen mixed between cropped nylon parks, washed denim, and technical windbreakers. As a highlight, we caught sight of the new Dior camo bag, clipped together and worn cross-shoulder, and new luggage styles, too.

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Courtesy of The Kooples.

Cerruti focused on warm tones, formal-meets-casual tailoring, and comfortability for outerwear throughout the collection. We caught sight of unisex pieces on women, furthering the futuristic (yet realistic) idea of a shared wardrobe. Accessories like quilted tote bags, belt pouches, and calfskin sneakers, and metal aviator glasses reminded us to add that extra piece on before heading out.

Faith Connexion re-explored menswear essentials, giving a nod to the 1990s. We saw longer, wider collars and trousers, button-up track bottoms, painted denim, embellished bodysuits, and sporty tweed shirts. Other shirts and sweatshirts referenced the importance of environmental engagement, featuring screen-printed recycling logos and slogans in three languages. Youth culture is in, and a playful focus is what this new collection was all about.

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Courtesy of Cerruti.

Enfants Riches Déprimés had a special show for its Spring/Summer 2018 pre-collection unveiling, located at Christie’s in Paris—the first time in which the historic auction house has opened its doors to host a fashion show. Designer Henri Alexander’s concepts were complemented with curated paintings by him on display, which had been on view at Christie’s for days prior. References of realism clashed with thoughts of capitalism, neo-Dadaism, regression, and the unconscious—all seen in the paintings, garments, and overall setting.

Jil Sander presented a collection focused on comfort, necessity, and protection, asking questions like, “What is valuable, elemental, and important enough to develop in the future?” The result was a strong collection, full of warm pieces, modern and familiar silhouettes, and the layering of essential pieces. Outerwear shapes (like down coats inspired by military sleeping bags) were seen contrasted with constructed tailoring. Natural cotton hues flowed nicely with tones of green, beige, and grey. Accessories were approachable and sophisticated with soft leather, and footwear took on new form with textured rubber overlays, angular forms, and vulcanized construction.

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Courtesy of Faith Connexion.

Berluti’s fall/winter 2018 collection reflected a quiet, calm man in the age of loud and proud. Designer Haider Ackermann’s reflected ease and self-assurance through pure and pared-down clothes. Luxury shined through handcrafted jackets, reversible cashmere coats, leather trenches, and bits of detail in the linings. A new shoe, the Alessandro One Cut, was seen, as was a leather and silver cigarette case.

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Courtesy of Enfants Riches Déprimés.
Alexandre ElichaBerluticerrutiDior HommeEliza JordanEnfants Riches Déprimésfaith connexionfall/winter 2018fashionFashion WeekFW18FW2018Haider AckermannJil SanderKim JonesLouis VuittonLVmen's fashionmenswearParisParis Fashion WeekThe KooplesWhitewall

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