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Courtesy of Marni.
Courtesy of MM6 Maison Margiela.
Courtesy of Tod's.
Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo.
Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo.
Fashion

Milan Fashion Week FW21: Marni, MM6 Maison Margiela, Tod’s, and Ferragamo

By Eliza Jordan

March 1, 2021

This week in Milan, fashion houses are presenting their collections for Fall/Winter 2021. Below, we’re sharing details on the latest from Marni, MM6 Maison Margiela, Tod’s, and Ferragamo.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Marni.

Marni took us down an intimate virtual path to embrace the idea of romanticism. Nonchalant or intense, romance can be something we desire to feel, touch, and see. Today, with many longing the physical components of romance, we’re left to daydream about what it rationally can be. The label’s latest collection is an ode to that; where romance can be found elsewhere, in elements like color and shape. The sun’s rays inform colors and prints, giving light to hues like burnt amber and washes of warm waves—from yellow to orange, red to purple. Items like keys, scissors, and sunflowers have have seemingly been left on clothes, outlined on garments from the power of the sun. Silhouettes range in appearance, from voluminous to deconstructed, with zippers, ruffles, and constructed bits giving life to dresses, hoodies, biker jackets, and trousers. Crochet sweaters, faux fur pieces, and trench coats with petticoat treatment collectively roar an emotional cheer for the romantic in us all.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of MM6 Maison Margiela.

MM6 Maison Margiela is moving backward, inspired by the motions of inside-out, upside-down, and back-to-front. Traditional dressing is shaken up to reveal pieces reimagined for something new. The starting point for the collection was a simple question: “How do pieces transform when their iconic parts are slightly rearranged, or totally scrambled?” The answer, however, was complex—a complete reset to the wardrobe. While changing conventional design and experimenting with micro and macro details, the brand took cues from composers and artists, like Erik Satie, Marcel Duchamp, John Cage, and Andy Warhol—who played with chords, rhythm, repetition, and form for new elusive ideas to emerge. Similarly, the house intertwines the beginning with the end, revealing outfits that at first seem confusing—like dresses pulled down in the front, worn with a contrasting top—that just work. Long, loose gloves are worn high above the elbow with a spaghetti-strap top, frayed at its edges and dangling black strips of fabric and belted with a black bow. Another model wears a cropped Sherpa-lined leather coat, carrying a bag made of the same materials. Behind the presentation, a piano player performs a similar tune that, at times, rewinds and starts over mysteriously, causing a delusion that’s delightful, somewhat familiar, and totally new.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Tod's.

Tod’s presents its latest collection “In a Moment” with four models over floors of marble inlays. Creative director Walter Chiapponi offers a new look at the Tod’s woman—made of many stories, gestures, movements, and ideas. The latest pieces offer something for every one of her many sides, blended with function and utility. Leather-trimmed trench coats, duvet jackets, knee-length dresses, shirts tied with pussy bows, and large sheepskin hats welcome women to explore every side of themselves through dressing. Exaggerated bags (like the T Timeless) join other soft hobo styles (like the Oboe), paired with chunky heeled loafers, moccasins, kitten heels, and belts—all with a swath of Italian elegance and edge. 

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo.

Salvatore Ferragamo is summoning new energy for the seasons ahead with a concept entitled “Future Positive.” The collection’s notes start by pointing out that all tech-forward inventions we know and use today—like self-driving cars, video conferences, and space travel—were all dreamt up and shown in a science fiction light before their creation. Our ideas, while they may feel out of reach today, help shape the future. For its latest collection, creative director Paul Andrews saw past the present day and into the future’s infinite possibilities, filled with change and achievements. The show is divided into two locations—one virtual, futuristically inspired by New York, and one actual, the Rotonda della Besana in Italy. The digital metropolis is rendered and inhabited by models wearing the collection, and the physical space in Milan hosts real-life models in its circular avant-garde space, too. As each woman walks through the pyramid-like prism, infinite rainbows of color fill the space, signifying an optimistic look into a diverse future.

FW21MarniMilan Fashion WeekMM6Salvatore FerragamoTod's

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