Menu

  • Art
  • Lifestyle
  • Fashion
  • Design
  • Sustainability
  • Homepage
  • Whitewall Presents
  • Whitewaller
  • Insiders

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Subscribe to the Magazine

Presents

Miami

Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe, Kennedy Yanko, Reginald O’Neal, and Cajsa von Zeipel

Newsletter

Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

Ok
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Louis Vuitton FW21
Fashion

Time-Traveling with Louis Vuitton and Fornasetti for FW21

By Eliza Jordan

March 10, 2021

This morning through an enchanting lens, Louis Vuitton magnified the creative world of artist Fornasetti for its Fall/Winter 2021 collection. Presented in the spectacular setting of the Michelangelo and Daru Galleries in the Louvre Museum, the house welcomed viewers to time-travel through the worlds of art and fashion for an aesthetic anew.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

For inspiration, the house’s artistic director of women’s collections, Nicolas Ghesquière, dove deep into Fornasetti’s history to explore its expertise in art and design. First created by the Milanese artist Piero Fornasetti in 1940, the studio gained prominence for its hand-drawn images. Intimate motifs—from the sun and the moon to animals and human faces—were fantastically portrayed on not just paper, but on nontraditional materials, too, like dish plates. Today, the atelier’s inimitable work is seen respectfully reimagined on other items for the home, including pillows, wallpaper, candles, furniture pieces, and more.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

Ghesquière first visited the Milan-based atelier, which includes an archive of 13,000 original pieces. In dialogue with the artist’s son and the artistic director of Fornasetti, Barnaba Fornasetti, Ghesquière selected specific themes and artworks to feature on garments and accessories. Through a combination of colors, textures, and techniques, the result was a stunning offering of pieces made from a mix of tradition and modernity.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

“My father was an innovator who believed in the handmade, just like Louis Vuitton,” said Fornasetti. “Our vision has always been to bring Fornasetti’s unique artistic imagination to people through beautifully crafted objects, and this rewarding collaboration represents a new opportunity to expand and explore its visual creativity.”

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

Jacquard, laser printing, embroidered details, and tailored elements all made up the ambience of the aesthetic. Fornasetti’s drawings of ancient statues were overlaid on high-tech thermal-camera imagery, seen on shiny printed jersey tops; velvet dresses, oversized outwear, fleece hooded jackets, and strapless sequined dresses are complemented by archival Fornasetti prints of buildings, locks, keys, and portraits.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

“With this collaboration, I wanted to use the pieces to evoke the continuing modernity of Fornasetti’s artistic world,” said Ghesquière. “Fornasetti’s enduring body of work is the realization of a remarkable hand-drawn technique and magical take on the world, and I am particularly drawn to the way Fornasetti re-explored and reworked the heritage of classicism and ancient Rome, adding new references to historical imagery.”

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

Iconic black-and-white motifs were seen in a captivating new light, making up the shape and appearance of bags. The leather Cannes bag featured an architectural drawing reminiscent of the Baptistery in Florence; and the Petite Malle was reworked and inflated, covered in a dome-printed metallic leather. Roman Gladiator sandals were brought to the modern day, perfect for the cooler months with an enclosed leather body, ankle straps, and a dainty froward-facing bow.

Open Gallery

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

“As a designer who has always loved fashion’s ability to evoke the past, present, and future simultaneously, I wanted to add new layers to this creative palimpsest. Exploring the Fornasetti archives had the excitement of an archaeological dig, searching for and finding drawings from the past to give them a new life for Louis Vuitton—for now and the future,” added Ghesquière.

Fall/Winter 2021FornasettiLouis VuittonNicolas Ghesquière

Recommended

Fashion |November 22, 2021

Miu Miu Celebrates the Nuit Collection In New York

Our ValuesContactAdvertiseTerms
© Whitewall 2020

Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

Subscribe to the Newsletter