Menu

  • Art
  • Lifestyle
  • Fashion
  • Design
  • Sustainability
  • Homepage
  • Whitewall Presents
  • Whitewaller
  • Insiders

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Subscribe to the Magazine

Presents

Riviera

Mary McCartney: Moment of Affection

Newsletter

Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

Ok
Photo by Edward Boches for Praise Shadows Art Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Praise Shadows Art Gallery, © Duke Riley.
Duke Riley, "No. 265 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum," 2020, salvaged, painted plastic, photo by Duke Riley, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.
Duke Riley, "I’m Delicious, Come On Get Your Money’s Worth," 2020, found plastic trash, mahogany, photo by Robert Bredvad, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.
Duke Riley, "Nos. 50-P, 74-P, 10, 70, 112, and 106 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum," 2020, salvaged, painted plastic, photo by Robert Bredvad, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.
Duke Riley, "Monument to Five Thousand Years of Temptation and Deception (I)," 2020. Salvaged, painted plastic, mahogany, photo by Will Howcroft for Praise Shadows Art Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Praise Shadows Art Gallery, MA, © Duke Riley.
Duke Riley (American, born 1972). Nos. 50-P, 74-P, 10, 70, 112, and 106 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum, 2020. Salvaged, painted plastic. Courtesy of the artist. © Duke Riley. (Photo: Robert Bredvad)
Photo by Edward Boches for Praise Shadows Art Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Praise Shadows Art Gallery, © Duke Riley.
Sustainability

Duke Riley Makes Waves with Big Plastic

By Isabelle Friedman

July 13, 2022

Duke Riley has no qualms about rocking the boat of the plastics industry. In “DEATH TO THE LIVING, Long Live Trash” at the Brooklyn Museum, the artist repurposes discarded plastics found across Northeast American beaches into maritime-themed pieces, drawing parallels between the whaling industry’s and the plastics industry’s environmental impacts

Open Gallery

Duke Riley, "Nos. 50-P, 74-P, 10, 70, 112, and 106 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum," 2020, salvaged, painted plastic, photo by Robert Bredvad, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.

On view now through April 23, 2023 are close to 250 works—both new and old‚ including Riley’s modern adaptation of scrimshaws. Scrimshaws are etchings typically created by whalers on the byproducts of whales, but instead of using whale teeth or bones, Riley utilizes repurposed plastic containers. The artist maintains the traditional imagery of scrimshaws but also depicts international business leaders of the plastics industry. Riley selected a few examples of 19th-century pieces from the Brooklyn Museum’s collection to display in comparison. The exhibit further connects to the past in the 17th- and 18th-century Jan Martense Schenck and Nicholas Schenck Houses, a pair of American period rooms available to the public to experience for the first time.

Open Gallery

Duke Riley, "I’m Delicious, Come On Get Your Money’s Worth," 2020, found plastic trash, mahogany, photo by Robert Bredvad, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.

Riley balances his critiques with reflections on those promoting clean waterways and reduced plastic consumption. He presents short films highlighting the work of New York community members, and the Brooklyn Museum is working on collaborations with organizations such as the New York Aquarium, in addition to grassroots groups, to further promote sustainability and clean waterways in New York. 

Open Gallery

Duke Riley, "No. 265 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum," 2020, salvaged, painted plastic, photo by Duke Riley, courtesy of the artist, © Duke Riley.

Riley emphasizes that although the material goods have changed, capitalism’s environmental impact remains just as dangerous to our waterways, and “DEATH TO THE LIVING, Long Live Trash” encourages all to reflect on their individual consumer habits and the immense scale of the environmental impact of larger corporations.

Open Gallery

Duke Riley, "Monument to Five Thousand Years of Temptation and Deception (I)," 2020. Salvaged, painted plastic, mahogany, photo by Will Howcroft for Praise Shadows Art Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Praise Shadows Art Gallery, MA, © Duke Riley.

Open Gallery

Duke Riley (American, born 1972). Nos. 50-P, 74-P, 10, 70, 112, and 106 of The Poly S. Tyrene Memorial Maritime Museum, 2020. Salvaged, painted plastic. Courtesy of the artist. © Duke Riley. (Photo: Robert Bredvad)
Brooklyn MuseumDuke RileyNew York

Recommended

Sustainability |August 4, 2022

Koen Vanmechelen Breaks the Shell with Temptation

Our ValuesContactAdvertiseTerms
© Whitewall 2020

Go inside the worlds of art, fashion, design, and lifestyle.

Subscribe to the Newsletter