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Installation view, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room,” photo by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room,” photo by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room,” photo by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room,” photo by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Installation view, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room,” photo by Anna-Marie Kellen, courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
New York, Upper East Side

Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room

“Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room” is a presentation honoring the historic Seneca Village, destroyed to complete Central Park.

An ongoing presentation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room” is a fabricated domestic space conceived around New York City’s historic Seneca Village, which was located in an area that is now part of Central Park. A community of predominantly Black landowners, Seneca Village was seized by eminent domain and its residents displaced in 1857 in order to make room for the park. Titled for the words of Virginia Hamilton, retelling the legend of the Flying African, The Met’s presentation embraces the African belief that past, present, and future are interconnected, proposing a visual tale of what could have been if Seneca Village had not been destroyed through an array of works, including commissions from Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Fabiola Jean-Louis, and Jenn Nkiru.

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1000 5th Ave, New York, NY 10028, USA
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room
“Before Yesterday We Could Fly: An Afrofuturist Period Room” is a presentation honoring the historic Seneca Village, destroyed to complete Central Park.

Exhibitions

New York, Lower East Side |Exhibitions

Sara Mejia Kriendler

Sara Mejia Kriendler's "Mother's Milk" is a landscape representative of a spiritual body, used to look at ideas of nurture, nourishment, and creation.

Pat Phillips: Consumer Reports

In "Consumer Reports,” Pat Phillips navigates the realities and social dynamics of consumer America and our relationship to material goods.

Ruby Neri: Leveled

Ruby Neri’s second solo presentation at Salon 94, “Leveled” features a selection of new paintings and sculptures.

Betty Woodman: House of the South

“House of the South” is an exhibition of the late artist Betty Woodman, featuring her 1996 installation of the same name.

Xavier Veilhan: Autofocus

Xavier Veilhan’s “Autofocus” marks a departure from the faceted figures that have frequented the artist’s practice for the last several years, replacing them with smooth, edgeless sculptural forms.

New Museum Triennial: Soft Water Hard Stone

New Museum’s Triennial “Soft Water Hard Stone” features works centering states of transformation and our relationship with the natural world.

Hilma af Klint: Tree of Knowledge

“Tree of Knowledge” is an exhibition of rare works centered around Hilma af Klint’s series on paper, which bears the same name.

Ruth Asawa: All Is Possible

At David Zwirner’s 537 West 20th Street location, the gallery is presenting an exhibition of the late artist Ruth Asawa, titled “All Is Possible.”

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